A Great Cosmic Sociological Thought Experiment: a Review of Liu Cixin’s Death’s End

I read this 600-page book twice in one year because I didn’t know what to make of it the first time I did. It was both impressively thought-provoking and infuriating at the same time. On my first ride around the block, I definitely didn’t like it as much as I did the two previous booksContinue reading “A Great Cosmic Sociological Thought Experiment: a Review of Liu Cixin’s Death’s End”

British Warlocks Vs. Nazi Psychic Super Soldiers: a Review of Ian Tregillis’ Milkweed Tryptich

Last year, I read Mr Tregillis’ alternate history fantasy series The Alchemy Wars which was fun romp through a world where Dutch horologists discovered the secret to building clockwork automatons which made them the dominant power in the world while the French (with their metallurgical arts) fight a losing war against them. Before Mr TregillisContinue reading “British Warlocks Vs. Nazi Psychic Super Soldiers: a Review of Ian Tregillis’ Milkweed Tryptich”

Into the Grishaverse: a Review of Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone Trilogy

The Shadow and Bone trilogy is Leigh Bardugo’s debut work and it had taken the YA fantasy world by storm and in a few short days, that stormfront will hit the mainstream when its highly anticipated Netflix adaptation premieres. Even though the TV series will bring in stuff from the Six of Crows duology (MsContinue reading “Into the Grishaverse: a Review of Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone Trilogy”

The Book that Dare Not Speak Its Genre: a Review of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

I love Margaret Atwood. I really do. I love The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace, and enjoyed The Testaments, even if it fell short of my expectations. And I think she is one of the few authors I consider to be incapable of writing a bad book because even if a story of hers doesContinue reading “The Book that Dare Not Speak Its Genre: a Review of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake”

Humanity’s Fight or Flight Response: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Dark Forest

“Yan Yan, do you know what the greatest expression of regard for a race or civilization is?” “No, what?” “Annihilation. That’s the highest respect a civilization can receive. They would only feel threatened by a civilization they truly respect.” As with the first book in the Remembrance of Earth’s Past trilogy—The Three-Body Problem—I think theContinue reading “Humanity’s Fight or Flight Response: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Dark Forest”

The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem

The more transparent something was, the more mysterious it seemed. The universe itself was transparent; as long as you were sufficiently sharp-eyed, you could see as far as you liked. But the farther you looked, the more mysterious it became. Even though I am ethnically Chinese, my experience with Chinese literature is severely underfed owingContinue reading “The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem”

Yer a Necromancer, Harry!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Harrow the Ninth

But Harrowhark—Harrow, who was two hundred dead children; Harrow, who loved something that had not been alive for ten thousand years—Harrowhark Nonagesimus had always wanted so badly to live. She had cost too much to die. Gideon the Ninth was one of the most effervescent fantasy debuts of 2019, and I picked it up solelyContinue reading “Yer a Necromancer, Harry!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Harrow the Ninth”

Do Clockwork Androids Dream of Electric Cuckoos?: A Review of Ian Tregillis’ The Mechanical

Clockmakers lie. I blame the unimaginative blurb for The Mechanical for putting me off reading it for this long. It was written in the first person, from the point of view of Jax, an enslaved “clakker” or “mechanical man” who ominously warns the reader that he shall be free someday. I mean, read this andContinue reading “Do Clockwork Androids Dream of Electric Cuckoos?: A Review of Ian Tregillis’ The Mechanical”

Lesbian Necromancers… IN SPACE!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Gideon the Ninth

“Nonagesimus,” she said slowly, “the only job I’d do for you would be if you wanted someone to hold the sword as you fell on it. The only job I’d do for you would be if you wanted your ass kicked so hard, the Locked Tomb opened and a parade came out to sing, ‘Lo!Continue reading “Lesbian Necromancers… IN SPACE!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Gideon the Ninth”

The Desperate Housewife of Chalion: A Review of Lois McMaster Bujold’s Paladin of Souls

I am the Mouth of Hell I encountered the word “paladin” when I was ten or eleven, and I learned it from the the real-time strategy game Warcraft II: Tides of Darkness. So the conception of a paladin in my head is one of burly armoured knights on horseback armed with holy magical abilities andContinue reading “The Desperate Housewife of Chalion: A Review of Lois McMaster Bujold’s Paladin of Souls”

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