Rick Deckard and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day: A Review of Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

In the irregular light the bounty hunter seemed a medium man, not impressive. Round face and hairless, smooth features; like a clerk in a bureaucratic office. Methodical but informal. Not demi-god in shape; not at all as Isidore had anticipated him. About 3 years ago, a friend of mine was surprised and delighted to findContinue reading “Rick Deckard and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day: A Review of Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?”

A Writer, a Muse, and a 15th Century Florentine Philosopher Walks into a Gelato Bar: A Review of Jo Walton’s Or What You Will

Ficino looks at him sadly. “How many times will I have to lose you, old friend?”“It doesn’t matter how many, does it? As long as you always get me back. Ms Walton remains one of the most original minds writing in the science-fiction and fantasy genre today to me, but even I could not anticipateContinue reading “A Writer, a Muse, and a 15th Century Florentine Philosopher Walks into a Gelato Bar: A Review of Jo Walton’s Or What You Will”

A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost

My grandfather’s grandfather walked under the heaven.That was another world. When I am a grandmother, they say, I may walk under heavenOn another world. But I am living my life now joyously in my worldHere in the middle of heaven. Paradises Lost is the second of Le Guin’s novellas I own the pleasure of readingContinue reading “A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost”

Steamboats, Vampires, and Slavery in the Antebellum South: a Review of George R. R. Martin’s Fevre Dream

Let the cattle create — life, beauty, what you will. And we shall take their creations, use them, destroy them if we choose. That is the way of it. We are the masters. Masters do not labor. Let them make the suits. We shall wear them. Let them build the steamboats. We shall ride uponContinue reading “Steamboats, Vampires, and Slavery in the Antebellum South: a Review of George R. R. Martin’s Fevre Dream”

A Paean to the Power of Music: A Review of China Miéville’s King Rat

I can squeeze between buildings through spaces you can’t even see. I can walk behind you so close my breath raises gooseflesh on your neck and you won’t hear me. I can hear the muscles in your eyes contract when your pupils dilate. I can feed off your filth and live in your house andContinue reading “A Paean to the Power of Music: A Review of China Miéville’s King Rat”

Music in the Time of COVID-19: A Review of Sarah Pinsker’s A Song for a New Day

Even after all that had happened, I’d somehow expected New York to be the same as always, unflappable… The pox, the people who’d shifted to working from home. I’d thought a city this dense everyone would have just laughed at any proposed changes, but it felt like fear had made a dent even here ImagineContinue reading “Music in the Time of COVID-19: A Review of Sarah Pinsker’s A Song for a New Day”

A Unique Fantasy Set in Parochial Domesticity: A Review of Jo Walton’s Lifelode

“What is it? For that matter, what is she?” “She’s a god, I think, or part of a broken god that the other part wants back…” I consider myself a Jo Walton super-fan, and I had read every novel she ever published save one, and that’s because up until recently, Lifelode only existed in veryContinue reading “A Unique Fantasy Set in Parochial Domesticity: A Review of Jo Walton’s Lifelode”

Revisiting Oceania in Audio: A Review of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four

We have cut the links between child and parent, and between man and man, and between man and woman. No one dares trust a wife or a child or a friend any longer. But in the future there will be no wives and no friends. Children will be taken from their mothers at birth, asContinue reading “Revisiting Oceania in Audio: A Review of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four”

A Wrestling Contest Between Feminism and the Patriarchy: a Film Review of Dangal

You have to fight in a way that people will remember you. If you win silver, sooner or later, you will be forgotten. If you win gold, you will be an example, And examples are given, child… not forgotten. See those girls? If you win tomorrow, you will not win alone. Millions of girls likeContinue reading “A Wrestling Contest Between Feminism and the Patriarchy: a Film Review of Dangal”

Heisting the Moon: A Review of Andy Weir’s Artemis

I read Andy Weir’s Artemis in the span of a short flight over the North Natuna Sea, and it is a sci-fi heist/crime thriller set on the moon, in its first human settlement. After Mr Weir’s The Martian, I have hungered after more stories featuring genius McGyvers solving their problems using the power of science.Continue reading “Heisting the Moon: A Review of Andy Weir’s Artemis”

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