The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem

The more transparent something was, the more mysterious it seemed. The universe itself was transparent; as long as you were sufficiently sharp-eyed, you could see as far as you liked. But the farther you looked, the more mysterious it became. Even though I am ethnically Chinese, my experience with Chinese literature is severely underfed owingContinue reading “The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem”

Chicago: Total War: a Review of Jim Butcher’s Battle Ground

I seized the tentacle that had me by the head and pulled hard enough to get enough counterpressure to keep it from snapping my neck—and it left me suspended uncomfortably, stretched out between the overwhelming opposing forces, just trying to hang on. Story of my freaking life. Harry Dresden, professional wizard. I’m a little busyContinue reading “Chicago: Total War: a Review of Jim Butcher’s Battle Ground”

The Intersectionality of Magical Academia: A Review of Naomi Novik’s A Deadly Education

I decided that Orion needed to die after the second time he saved my life. I am a fan of Naomi Novik from the very beginning. To date, I’ve read each and every one of her published novels, including all 9 books of her Napoleonic Wars dragon series, Temeraire. So she sits alongside China MiévilleContinue reading “The Intersectionality of Magical Academia: A Review of Naomi Novik’s A Deadly Education”

Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology

“There’s a lot of interesting stories about Greenhollow Wood, I know,” said Silver. “But that’s all they are—folktales. There are no dryads, no wild men, no fairy kings, and no monsters. Is that right, Mr Finch?” “Certainly haven’t seen a fairy king yet,” said Tobias. Even though I am a longtime fan of the fantasyContinue reading “Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology”

An Urban Fantasy, Literally: a Review of N. K. Jemisin’s The City We Became

Come, then, City That Never Sleeps. Let me show you what lurks in the empty spaces where nightmares dare not tread. I fell hard for Dan Harmon’s sitcom Community about 10 years ago, long before Mr Harmon found mainstream recognition for his writing in Rick and Morty. I was so much of a fan thatContinue reading “An Urban Fantasy, Literally: a Review of N. K. Jemisin’s The City We Became”

The Haunting of Jevick of Tyom: A Review of Sofia Samatar’s A Stranger in Olondria

My father is a palmand my mother is a jacaranda tree.I go sailing from Ilavet to Pravin my boat, in my little skin boat. Jo Walton is an inveterate recommender of books. In 2014, she published What Makes This Book So Great, a collection of 130 essays about fantasy and science fiction books she loves.Continue reading “The Haunting of Jevick of Tyom: A Review of Sofia Samatar’s A Stranger in Olondria”

Yer a Necromancer, Harry!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Harrow the Ninth

But Harrowhark—Harrow, who was two hundred dead children; Harrow, who loved something that had not been alive for ten thousand years—Harrowhark Nonagesimus had always wanted so badly to live. She had cost too much to die. Gideon the Ninth was one of the most effervescent fantasy debuts of 2019, and I picked it up solelyContinue reading “Yer a Necromancer, Harry!: A Review of Tamsyn Muir’s Harrow the Ninth”

250 Galloping McGuffins: A Review of Guy Gavriel Kay’s Under Heaven

At the absolute summit of accomplishment the insects chewing from within at the most extravagant sandalwood may be heard, if the nights are quiet enough. I am nominally Chinese though I understand I am not very good at being Chinese. I speak both Mandarin and Cantonese but only read Chinese at the level of aContinue reading “250 Galloping McGuffins: A Review of Guy Gavriel Kay’s Under Heaven”

Do Clockwork Androids Dream of Electric Cuckoos?: A Review of Ian Tregillis’ The Mechanical

Clockmakers lie. I blame the unimaginative blurb for The Mechanical for putting me off reading it for this long. It was written in the first person, from the point of view of Jax, an enslaved “clakker” or “mechanical man” who ominously warns the reader that he shall be free someday. I mean, read this andContinue reading “Do Clockwork Androids Dream of Electric Cuckoos?: A Review of Ian Tregillis’ The Mechanical”

The Long-Awaited Return of Harry Dresden: A Review of Jim Butcher’s Peace Talks

The supernatural world had been kind of topsy-turvy lately. Some lunatic had managed to wipe out the Red Court of Vampires completely, and the resulting vacuum had destabilized balances of power that were centuries old. The biggest result of the chaos was that the Fomor, the undersea power hardly anyone had spoken about during myContinue reading “The Long-Awaited Return of Harry Dresden: A Review of Jim Butcher’s Peace Talks”

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