Over Sideways and Under, On a Magic Carpet Ride: A Review of R. B. Lemberg’s The Four Profound Weaves

The first of the Four Profound Weaves is woven from wind. It signifies change. I am a little speechless, and I don’t really know how to talk about this book, because The Four Profound Weaves is the sort of book that makes me not want to do anything except stare at nothing for awhile. ItContinue reading “Over Sideways and Under, On a Magic Carpet Ride: A Review of R. B. Lemberg’s The Four Profound Weaves”

Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology

“There’s a lot of interesting stories about Greenhollow Wood, I know,” said Silver. “But that’s all they are—folktales. There are no dryads, no wild men, no fairy kings, and no monsters. Is that right, Mr Finch?” “Certainly haven’t seen a fairy king yet,” said Tobias. Even though I am a longtime fan of the fantasyContinue reading “Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology”

Once Upon a Time in a Malaysian Coffeehouse: A Review of Zen Cho’s The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water

“… Let the lady be. Heaven will punish her if she is wrong.” “That’s right,” said the waitress, but the customer did not agree. “Lady!” he snorted. “This girl is a useless slut.” “Actually I’m a nun,” said the waitress, pointing at her bald head. “So, literally the opposite of a slut!” Zen Cho’s novella,Continue reading “Once Upon a Time in a Malaysian Coffeehouse: A Review of Zen Cho’s The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water”

A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost

My grandfather’s grandfather walked under the heaven.That was another world. When I am a grandmother, they say, I may walk under heavenOn another world. But I am living my life now joyously in my worldHere in the middle of heaven. Paradises Lost is the second of Le Guin’s novellas I own the pleasure of readingContinue reading “A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost”

American Imperialism… IN SPACE!: A Review of Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Word for World is Forest

I close the year 2019 as I close the cover to Le Guin’s 1972 Hugo Award-winning novella, The Word for World is Forest. I laugh readily when I read, but I am less easily moved—so I was taken by surprise when I found tears in my eyes by the end of this slim 128-page volume.Continue reading “American Imperialism… IN SPACE!: A Review of Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Word for World is Forest”

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