The Post-Apocalyptic Wild West of Great Britain: a Review of Jonathan Stroud’s The Outlaws Scarlett and Browne

Jonathan Stroud is one of my favourite children and young adult writers working today, and the goodwill I feel towards him for writing the Bartimaeus books in the early 2000’s is still very much alive to this day. There is a “brand” I associate with Mr Stroud’s writing, and it is a brand characterised byContinue reading “The Post-Apocalyptic Wild West of Great Britain: a Review of Jonathan Stroud’s The Outlaws Scarlett and Browne”

Which is It? Deadpool 2 or Teen Titans Go! To the Movies?

This is a 2018 superhero film featuring multiple superheroes with strong comedic elements and the constant breaking of the 4th wall. It features a character that people called Deadpool who dresses in red and black and fights with guns and swords. The film also references to other films in both the Marvel and DC CinematicContinue reading “Which is It? Deadpool 2 or Teen Titans Go! To the Movies?”

The Book that Dare Not Speak Its Genre: a Review of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

I love Margaret Atwood. I really do. I love The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace, and enjoyed The Testaments, even if it fell short of my expectations. And I think she is one of the few authors I consider to be incapable of writing a bad book because even if a story of hers doesContinue reading “The Book that Dare Not Speak Its Genre: a Review of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake”

Humanity’s Fight or Flight Response: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Dark Forest

“Yan Yan, do you know what the greatest expression of regard for a race or civilization is?” “No, what?” “Annihilation. That’s the highest respect a civilization can receive. They would only feel threatened by a civilization they truly respect.” As with the first book in the Remembrance of Earth’s Past trilogy—The Three-Body Problem—I think theContinue reading “Humanity’s Fight or Flight Response: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Dark Forest”

The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem

The more transparent something was, the more mysterious it seemed. The universe itself was transparent; as long as you were sufficiently sharp-eyed, you could see as far as you liked. But the farther you looked, the more mysterious it became. Even though I am ethnically Chinese, my experience with Chinese literature is severely underfed owingContinue reading “The Holy War for the Soul of Science: a Review of Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem”

The Time Traveling Sex Offender: a Review of Audrey Niffenegger’s The Time Traveler’s Wife

I turn to look at Clare and just for a moment I forget that she is young, and that this is long ago; I see Clare, my wife, superimposed on the face of this young girl, and I don’t know what to say to this Clare who is old and young and different from otherContinue reading “The Time Traveling Sex Offender: a Review of Audrey Niffenegger’s The Time Traveler’s Wife”

2020 Nebula Awards: My Guest Appearance on the Two Book Nerds Talking Podcast

This is a bit of a throwback but earlier in May, before this blog existed, I was invited as a guest on Diana and Honey’s Two Book Nerds Talking podcast along with Malaysian writer Tina Isaacs to discuss the nominees for this year’s Nebula Awards. We mostly talked about the hopefuls for Best Novel andContinue reading “2020 Nebula Awards: My Guest Appearance on the Two Book Nerds Talking Podcast”

Rick Deckard and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day: A Review of Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

In the irregular light the bounty hunter seemed a medium man, not impressive. Round face and hairless, smooth features; like a clerk in a bureaucratic office. Methodical but informal. Not demi-god in shape; not at all as Isidore had anticipated him. About 3 years ago, a friend of mine was surprised and delighted to findContinue reading “Rick Deckard and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day: A Review of Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?”

A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost

My grandfather’s grandfather walked under the heaven.That was another world. When I am a grandmother, they say, I may walk under heavenOn another world. But I am living my life now joyously in my worldHere in the middle of heaven. Paradises Lost is the second of Le Guin’s novellas I own the pleasure of readingContinue reading “A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost”

Frankenstein’s Creature is an Incel: A Review of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

I read Mrs Shelley’s Frankenstein for the first time this week and my experience with Frankenstein and his creature had hitherto been limited to what I gleaned through pop cultural osmosis, those animated Hotel Transylvania movies (all 3), and that ill-fated Aaron Eckhart film-shaped abomination that calls itself I, Frankenstein. As is the fashion ofContinue reading “Frankenstein’s Creature is an Incel: A Review of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

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