Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology

“There’s a lot of interesting stories about Greenhollow Wood, I know,” said Silver. “But that’s all they are—folktales. There are no dryads, no wild men, no fairy kings, and no monsters. Is that right, Mr Finch?” “Certainly haven’t seen a fairy king yet,” said Tobias. Even though I am a longtime fan of the fantasyContinue reading “Something’s Waiting in the Bushes of Love: A Review of Emily Tesh’s Greenhollow Duology”

The Bromance Book Club Growls for #MeToo: A Review of Lyssa Kay Adams’ Undercover Bromance

You use weakness as a weapon. You’re so ashamed of your own mistakes in life, so afraid of your own fragility, that you accuse everyone else around you of being soft just for the crime of basic human frailty. I am still a baby when it comes contemporary romance and since I enjoyed the firstContinue reading “The Bromance Book Club Growls for #MeToo: A Review of Lyssa Kay Adams’ Undercover Bromance”

Japanese Landscaping During the Malayan Emergency: A Film Review of The Garden of Evening Mists

On 16th January 2020, I attended the sneak preview for the film adaptation of The Garden of Evening Mists, and I have Thoughts. I will preface this by saying that while I liked the Mr Tan Twan Eng’s book, I did not love it, and had really wanted the film to surpass its ink-and-paper sourceContinue reading “Japanese Landscaping During the Malayan Emergency: A Film Review of The Garden of Evening Mists”

Which is It? A Man Called Ove or Up?

I recently experienced a moving story revolving around an old man of Nordic descent surviving the death of his free-spirited wife, and engaging in behaviour that threatens his own life. In the process, he inadvertently met and became reluctantly entwined with a pushy younger person-of-colour. The old man is a very disagreeable curmudgeon who spendsContinue reading “Which is It? A Man Called Ove or Up?”

This is Your Brain on Epilepsy: A Review of Iasmin Omar Ata’s Mis(h)adra

I picked this graphic novel at the recent Big Bad Wolf sale without knowing anything about it, but something about the cover and title got its hooks into me. Mis(h)adra is a bit of a wordplay referencing two Arabic words: “mishadra”, which means “cannot”, and “misadra” which means seizure. In a way, it is anContinue reading “This is Your Brain on Epilepsy: A Review of Iasmin Omar Ata’s Mis(h)adra”

The Cost of Society: A Review of Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman

I recently spent a week in Japan for my holiday, and I wanted to read something that would inform me on contemporary Japanese society. I saw Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman being recommended by many reviewers—and having read it, I find myself equally inclined to recommend it. One of the tropes I enjoy in literatureContinue reading “The Cost of Society: A Review of Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman”

My First Contemporary Romance Novel: A Review of Lyssa Kay Adams’ The Bromance Book Club

I always thought I have been pretty undiscriminating when it comes to book genres. I would read my mother’s hand-me-down Jackie Collins and my ex’s Sophie Kinsella books, so I was quite surprised when I was told that most of what I read before (which I thought are romantic works), does not actually belong inContinue reading “My First Contemporary Romance Novel: A Review of Lyssa Kay Adams’ The Bromance Book Club”

A Girl and a Boy from Osaka: A Review of Higashino Keigo’s Under the Midnight Sun

I am a new initiate into the fandom of Higashino Keigo and Under the Midnight Sun (the US publisher dropped the “Journey” from the title) is the second of his books I have the opportunity to read—my first being, unsurprisingly, The Devotion of Suspect X. I did not like it as much as I didContinue reading “A Girl and a Boy from Osaka: A Review of Higashino Keigo’s Under the Midnight Sun”

May 13 for Young Adults: A Review of Hanna Alkaf’s The Weight of Our Sky

I am a little ashamed to say that Hanna Alkaf’s The Weight of Our Sky is the first and only novel written by a Malaysian author I have ever read, even though I am Malaysian. It is probably because my personal poison is fantasy and sci-fi, and there are simply not a lot of SFFContinue reading “May 13 for Young Adults: A Review of Hanna Alkaf’s The Weight of Our Sky”

The Secret History of Hercule Poirot: A TV Review of The ABC Murders

I just watch the 3-part miniseries adapting one of my favourite Poirot novels: The ABC Murders. It stars the unlikely John Malkovich as Hercule Poirot—a casting stunt comparable to having Heath Ledger play the Joker in The Dark Knight. There are usually changes one makes when a book is adapted for the screen, and screenwritersContinue reading “The Secret History of Hercule Poirot: A TV Review of The ABC Murders”

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