A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost

My grandfather’s grandfather walked under the heaven.That was another world. When I am a grandmother, they say, I may walk under heavenOn another world. But I am living my life now joyously in my worldHere in the middle of heaven. Paradises Lost is the second of Le Guin’s novellas I own the pleasure of readingContinue reading “A Space Novella About the Immigrant Experience, the Chinese Diaspora, & Faith: A Review of Ursula K. LeGuin’s Paradises Lost”

Steamboats, Vampires, and Slavery in the Antebellum South: a Review of George R. R. Martin’s Fevre Dream

Let the cattle create — life, beauty, what you will. And we shall take their creations, use them, destroy them if we choose. That is the way of it. We are the masters. Masters do not labor. Let them make the suits. We shall wear them. Let them build the steamboats. We shall ride uponContinue reading “Steamboats, Vampires, and Slavery in the Antebellum South: a Review of George R. R. Martin’s Fevre Dream”

Frankenstein’s Creature is an Incel: A Review of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

I read Mrs Shelley’s Frankenstein for the first time this week and my experience with Frankenstein and his creature had hitherto been limited to what I gleaned through pop cultural osmosis, those animated Hotel Transylvania movies (all 3), and that ill-fated Aaron Eckhart film-shaped abomination that calls itself I, Frankenstein. As is the fashion ofContinue reading “Frankenstein’s Creature is an Incel: A Review of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

Black Lives Matter and US Foreign Policy: A Review of Max Gladstone’s Last First Snow

For false gods, they cast long shadows. I have no educational background in literature, and when I write reviews of books I read, I am not able to engage in the exercise on a highly esoteric level. I do however, strive to relate the book I am examining to other works I have encountered, andContinue reading “Black Lives Matter and US Foreign Policy: A Review of Max Gladstone’s Last First Snow”

A Paean to the Power of Music: A Review of China Miéville’s King Rat

I can squeeze between buildings through spaces you can’t even see. I can walk behind you so close my breath raises gooseflesh on your neck and you won’t hear me. I can hear the muscles in your eyes contract when your pupils dilate. I can feed off your filth and live in your house andContinue reading “A Paean to the Power of Music: A Review of China Miéville’s King Rat”

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started