A Children’s Guide to Scepticism and Questioning Authority: A Review of Jonathan Stroud’s Heroes of the Valley

Jonathan Stroud is no longer as popular as he used to be, but he remains one of the few automatic-buy authors for me—if he has a new book or series out, I am on it like shit on fly—even though one would say I should have outgrown him long ago. There are still turns ofContinue reading “A Children’s Guide to Scepticism and Questioning Authority: A Review of Jonathan Stroud’s Heroes of the Valley”

Which is It? A Man Called Ove or Up?

I recently experienced a moving story revolving around an old man of Nordic descent surviving the death of his free-spirited wife, and engaging in behaviour that threatens his own life. In the process, he inadvertently met and became reluctantly entwined with a pushy younger person-of-colour. The old man is a very disagreeable curmudgeon who spendsContinue reading “Which is It? A Man Called Ove or Up?”

Sense and Censorability: A Review of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451

“It doesn’t matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that’s like you after you take your hands away. The difference between the man who just cuts lawns and a real gardener is in the touching, he said. The lawn-cutterContinue reading “Sense and Censorability: A Review of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451”

Moral Relativism for Young Adults: A Review of Joe Abercrombie’s Shattered Sea Trilogy

Young adult fiction must be paying well because I notice a lot of established fantasy authors like Brandon Sanderson, Django Wexler, and Joe Abercrombie breaking into it. I am an Abercrombie fan from way back, reading his “grimdark” First Law trilogy more than 10 years ago. I enjoyed it but like so many authors IContinue reading “Moral Relativism for Young Adults: A Review of Joe Abercrombie’s Shattered Sea Trilogy”

This is Your Brain on Epilepsy: A Review of Iasmin Omar Ata’s Mis(h)adra

I picked this graphic novel at the recent Big Bad Wolf sale without knowing anything about it, but something about the cover and title got its hooks into me. Mis(h)adra is a bit of a wordplay referencing two Arabic words: “mishadra”, which means “cannot”, and “misadra” which means seizure. In a way, it is anContinue reading “This is Your Brain on Epilepsy: A Review of Iasmin Omar Ata’s Mis(h)adra”

The Cost of Society: A Review of Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman

I recently spent a week in Japan for my holiday, and I wanted to read something that would inform me on contemporary Japanese society. I saw Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman being recommended by many reviewers—and having read it, I find myself equally inclined to recommend it. One of the tropes I enjoy in literatureContinue reading “The Cost of Society: A Review of Murata Sayaka’s Convenience Store Woman”

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